World’s oldest person dies, aged 116, just days after rival “supercentenarian”

By | June 12, 2013

20130612-071815.jpgJiroemon Kimura, a former postman, died of natural causes in hospital in his hometown of Kyotango, western Japan, in the early hours of Wednesday, city officials told CNN.In December, Kimura had been recognized by Guinness World Records as the world’s oldest living person, and as the oldest man whose age had ever been verified.

“I wanted him to live longer,” his nephew, Tamotsu Miyake, told Japanese television network TV Asahi. “His life was respectable; I would like to say “thank you” to him.”

Kimura, who attributed his longevity to eating light, healthy meals, worked for the post office until his retirement in 1962, continuing to carry out agricultural work until the age of 90.

Only the third man in history verified to have reached the age of 115, Kimura had seven children, 14 grandchildren, 25 great-grand children and 14 great-great grandchildren…

http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/12/world/asia/worlds-oldest-person-dies/index.html

What people mean when they say “healthy meals” varies a lot. What, specifically, did he eat mostly? I always wonder that but no one seems to have written a book on the Supercentenarian diet/lifestyle.

… I got bored and started exploring supercentenarian studies, as well as looking at some individual articles on people who have lived past 110 and their habits. Not that I expect to live that long, but I find it interesting nonetheless.

The lifestyle traits, especially their diets, vary significantly, and here is a short list of the trends that I saw most frequently:

1: Genetics – Nearly every person who lives a long, long time, has a family in which several others also lived a long, long time.
2: Disposition – Almost all of them were kind, optimistic, relaxed, patient, etc. Angry, bitter people that worry a lot tend to die young even if they have otherwise healthy habits, while those with more relaxed dispositions tend to live longer even if they have habits typically regarded as unhealthy.
3: Small portions – How much they ate seemed to be more important that what they ate. Though this was not a trait they all shared, it was common enough to be noticeable. People who tend to not eat until they are full, whether by choice or geographic/social limitations, tend to live longer. Those who frequently splurge do not.
4: Sex – For various reasons, both social and biological, women tend to live longer.
5: Active – They were not fitness fanatics, nor were they sedentary. They were simply active, meaning they were usually out doing something.
6: Small – Not obese, not well built (as in muscular), not tall on average. Small, thin, unbuilt people seem to live longer.

The one thing I did not see a trend on was diet, with possibly one exception. Most of these people ate lots of fish. Other than that, their diets were all over the place. A few were vegetarian, some lived off pork.

Walter Breuning (United States)
114

Two meals per day. Big breakfast, hearty lunch, no evening meal, snacked on fruit instead. Drank lots of water plus a cup and a half of coffee with breakfast and one cup with lunch.

Got up at 6:15 am and had breakfast at 7:30 am, and then exercised.
“We’re all going to die. Some people are scared of dying. Never be afraid to die. Because you’re born to die.”

Yukichi Chuganji (Japan)
114

Hated vegetables, but enjoyed regular meals of beef, pork, chicken, rice, miso soup and milk. Chewed caramels as a treat. Drank alcohol moderately.
Optimist

Jeanne Louise Calment (France)
122

Attributed her longevity to olive oil. Added it to nearly every food she ate and also rubbed it onto her skin.
Drank port wine frequently
1 kilo of chocolate every week
Took up fencing at age 85
Smoked until the age of 117, unspecified source says no more than 2 cigarettes per day….

Read the rest from Nomad888 on veggieboards

I’m blowing it by being tall, being male, and stressing out too much. Smaller regular meals is the easy part, then stress reduction and daily moderate exercise.

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