Triple That Vitamin D Intake, Panel Prescribes

By | December 2, 2010

That’s far lower than many doctors and major medical groups have been advocating–and it could dampen some of the enthusiasm that’s been building for the sunshine vitamin in recent years.

Many doctors have added blood tests of vitamin D levels to annual physicals, and sales of vitamin D supplements have soared to $425 million last year from $40 million in 2001, according to the Nutrition Business Journal.

It’s long been known that vitamin D is essential to maintaining strong bones. But hundreds of new studies have also linked low vitamin D levels to a higher risk of a slew of chronic health problems–heart disease, stroke, diabetes, prostate, breast and colon cancers, auto-immune diseases, infections, depression and cognitive decline. Studies have also suggested that many Americans are vitamin D deficient due to working and playing indoors and slathering on sunscreen.

The Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences that sets governmental nutrient levels, said there wasn’t enough evidence to prove that low vitamin D causes such chronic diseases; it based its new recommendations on the levels needed to maintain strong bones alone. …

The panel also raised the acceptable upper limit of daily intake to 4,000 IUs for adults, from 2,000 previously. …

The panel was also concerned about what she called “emerging evidence of concern” about possible ill effects of too much vitamin D. Besides a risk of kidney and heart damage noted with vitamin D levels of 10,000 IUs per day, Dr. Brannon said the panel had seen higher death rates from pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and other causes in men whose blood levels were above 50 ng/ml. The link is still tentative and may never be proven, she noted: “The difficulty is, you can’t design a trial to look at adverse effects.” …

He said that despite the paucity of randomized-controlled trials, the long list of chronic diseases associated with vitamin D does make sense, given that it is actually a hormone that affects virtually every organ in the human body and regulates as many as 2,000 genes.

For his part, Dr. Holick recommends that adults take 2,000 to 3,000 IUs per day–and notes that he had done studies giving subjects 50,000 IUs twice a month for six years and seen no harmful effects. “There is no downside to increasing your vitamin D intake, and there are more studies coming out almost on a weekly basis,” he said.€  …

via Triple That Vitamin D Intake, Panel Prescribes –

I’ve been sick for the past few days and yesterday I started taking 2,500 IUs/day of Vitamin D3 from a non-fish liver source.

3 thoughts on “Triple That Vitamin D Intake, Panel Prescribes

  1. Lere

    PROFESSOR Frank Garland, and his brother, Cedric, recommend […] taking 50,000 units of vitamin D per week for eight to twelve weeks followed by maintenance on 1,000 to 2,000 units a day‚Äù.
    ACCORDING Cedric F. Garland, Dr. P.H., FACE, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and Moores Cancer Center of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), “It is projected that raising the minimum year-around serum 25(OH)D level to 40-60 ng/ml (100-150 nmol/L) would prevent approximately 58,000 new cases of breast cancer and 49,000 new cases of colorectal cancer each year, and three quarters of deaths from these diseases, in the US and Canada.”
    Plasma vitamin D and mortality in older men: a community-based prospective cohort study.
    “There was a U-shaped association between vitamin D concentrations and total mortality. An approximately 50% higher total mortality rate was observed among men in the lowest 10% (98 nmol/L [or 39 ng/ml]) of plasma 25(OH)D concentrations compared with intermediate concentrations. Both high and low concentrations of plasma 25(OH)D are associated with elevated risks of overall and cancer mortality.
    Dr. Frank C. Garland, 1950-2010
    “Tuesday, August 17 at UCSD Thornton Hospital after contending with a nearly year-long illness.“

    “African Americans … are more likely to be vitamin D deficient due to their darker skin pigmentation’s ability to block the sun’s rays”
    It is not true that melanin blocks the wavelengths which synthesize vitamin D . The value of melanin as a sunscreen (2010).
    “epidermal melanin is not a neutral density filter providing no or minimal protection for the induction of erythema at 295 and 315 nm and some protection at 305 and 365 nm”
    It does block 305nm but around that wavelength is the most damaging A UVB Wavelength Dependency for Local Suppression of Recall Immunity in Humans Demonstrates a Peak at 300‚Äânm. also see Erythema curve. Note the relative danger curve ( yellow) peaks at around 305nm
    T the blocking of a limited spectra of vitamin D synthesizing UVB doesn’t matter the other wavelengths get through. Blood vitamin D levels in relation to genetic estimation of African ancestry “found novel evidence that the level of African ancestry [rather than skin pigmentation] may play a role in clinical vitamin D status”.
    There is a negative feedback system; evolution has has got vitamin D levels just right
    Klotho protein deficiency and aging.
    “α-Klotho protein is shown to function in the negative feedback regulation of vitamin D3 synthesis These observations indicated that abnormal vitamin D3 metabolism is the main cause of aging phenotypes.″
    Klotho was named after one of the Moirae or fates, supplementing vitamin D is indeed a fateful step.

    Many people of tropical ancestry have a optimum homeostasis of vitamin D which is below the new IoM levels, but if they’re wise they’ll not take supplements.

  2. vitamin d3

    On the topic of Vitamin D I’ve learned it plays an important role in the body which is required for the absorption and maintenance of calcium. Having the right levels of calcium in the body enables the maintenance of the appropriate structure within the bones, teeth and proper functioning of the nervous system. This is the major reason why we require the appropriate levels of vitamin D in our body. Vitamin D belongs to a group of fat-soluble vitamins. This means you need to transport the fats.

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