Brains cleaned while you sleep

It’s no secret that too little shut-eye can drain your brain, but scientists haven’t fully understood why. Now, a new study suggests that a good night’s sleep leaves you feeling sharp and refreshed because a newly discovered system that scrubs away neural waste is mostly active when you’re at rest. It’s a revelation that could… Read More »

Back when the earth had two moons

The theory that the Earth was born moonless and was hit by a Mars-sized plant, ejecting into space material that became our moon does not explain why the far side of the moon is so different from the side we see. Some researchers say our planet once had two moons. The missing satellite might still… Read More »

How the turtle got its shell

…All other animals with body armour, including lizards and armadillos, are known to form it from bony scales on the surface of their skin. Turtles are the only ones that fuse ribs and vertebrae to make a shell made up of around 50 bones on the outside of their bodies, it has been found. Until… Read More »

Compressing air for renewable energy storage

  Enough Northwest wind energy to power about 85,000 homes each month could be stored in porous rocks deep underground for later use, according to a new, comprehensive study. Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Bonneville Power Administration identified two unique methods for this energy storage approach and two eastern… Read More »

Someone Just Bought $148 Million Worth Of Bitcoin

Someone just transacted $148 million worth of Bitcoin. That’s about 195,000 Bitcoins. We say transacted because there is no way of knowing whether any money actually changed hands. The Bitcoins were transferred from several Blockchain “addresses” to another single address. Addresses are basically routing numbers, and an individual’s Bitcoin wallet can contain multiple addresses. So… Read More »

Video: WiSee: Wi-Fi signals enable gesture recognition throughout entire home

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZ7Nz942yAY WiSee: Wi-Fi signals enable gesture recognition throughout entire home – YouTube. WiFi is everywhere and still growing in 2018. This video from 2013 seems to support the odd claim that WiFi could potentially be used as part of a monitoring technology to map the layout of your house, your location inside it and even… Read More »

Fighting superbug bacteria with other bacteria

Want to save 10 million people? Find a solution to superbugs. … If things keep going as they are, antibiotic-resistant superbugs are expected to kill 10 million people by 2050, and so far, we have no solution. But researchers have found that we could actually fight fire with fire – a predatory bacterium has been… Read More »

Massaging Vest Combats Stress While You Wear It

Grabbing a massage as you walk around town has never been so easy. A group of Cornell students recently invented an electric vest embedded with tiny motors intended to knead and massage the user’s back and shoulders. The vest, which was created in hopes of relieving stress linked to negative health effects, was even designed… Read More »

LTE Cell Phone Radiation Affects Brain Activity in Cell Phone Users + Starlink to Kill the Earth?

Brain images pre- and post-LTE exposure The first study on the short-term effects of Long Term Evolution (LTE), the fourth generation cell phone technology, has been published online in the peer-reviewed journal, Clinical Neurophysiology. (1) In a controlled experiment, researchers exposed the right ear of 18 participants to LTE cellphone radiation for 30 minutes. The… Read More »

Teleportation of consciousness rediscovered

Experiments by researchers at the Karolinksa Institutet in Sweden show that it is possible to rather easily trick the mind’s sense of self into leaving the body. Given visual cues and physical sensations of the right timing your brain will ‘teleport’ what you experience as ‘you’ into space, into a complete stranger or even into a mannequin.  This can… Read More »

Surprising diversity in aging revealed in nature

For several species mortality increases with age — as expected by evolutionary scientists. This pattern is seen in most mammal species including humans and killer whales, but also in invertebrates like water fleas. However, other species experience a decrease in mortality as they age, and in some cases mortality drops all the way up to… Read More »

iPhones on AT&T get government “Carrier Settings” update.

  Modern smartphones have the ability to display emergency alerts pushed out by government agencies. These include notifications about dangerous weather, unsafe situations or Amber Alerts for missing children and seniors. Carriers must enable the features on specific phones and until today, iPhone users on AT&T were not invited to the party. Now, AT&T is… Read More »

British IKEA selling solar panels for free energy after 7 years

Swedish flatpack pioneers IKEA are providing eco-friendly British shoppers with their own solar panels. As well as their Billy bookcases, tea light candles and meatballs with lingonberry,IKEA customers can now get add the energy-boosting panels to their shopping trolley. The Skandinavian superstore rolled out the solar panels in their Southampton store yesterday and will sell… Read More »

Gut microbes predict undernutrition

Gut microbes may predict whether or not children will suffer undernutrition as they grow, according to a study with twins in Malawi. Tens of trillions of microbes live in the gut, where they synthesize vitamins and process nutrients in the diet to keep the body healthy. These microbes and their genes, collectively known as the… Read More »

Video: Enormous sink holes discovered in China

Natural sinkholes are rare, but researchers in China have just uncovered the largest cluster in the world, 49 of them covering an area of more than 231 square miles. Government officials in the Shaanxi province in northwest China report the collection of sinkholes was found during a recent survey of land around Hanzhong City. These… Read More »

ultra-rare “impossible” quasicrystal found in Russian meteorite

A quasicrystal’s atomic structure combines the symmetrical properties of a crystal and the chaos of an amorphous solid. Originating in outer space, these crystals aren’t just incredible because of how rare they are – their atomic structure is so peculiar, for decades their existence was dismissed as “impossible”, and they cost the scientist who first… Read More »

UNC neuroscientists discover new “mini-neural computer” in the brain

Dendrites, the branch-like projections of neurons, were once thought to be passive wiring in the brain. But now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that these dendrites do more than relay information from one neuron to the next. They actively process information, multiplying the brain’s computing power. “Suddenly, it’s… Read More »

Hopping out glowing green bunnies for science

There’s a long history of scientists creating glowing animals, ranging from fish to mice to cats. Now, a team of scientists from the University of Hawaii and two universities in Turkey have genetically engineered some adorable, fuzzy, glowing baby bunnies. Out of a herd of eight baby bunnies, two glow under blacklight. The glowing is… Read More »

Researchers: We can watch 3-D with only one eye

Humans can see 3-D images with only one eye, according to new research, suggesting a future in which the technology could become cheaper and more accessible. Simply looking through a small hole is enough to experience 3-D, says Dhanraj Vishwanath, a psychologist at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. His research was published in… Read More »

Video: Robotic Cheetah that can jump over small walls

This robotic cheetah from MIT is fun to watch (video below) To get a running jump, the robot plans out its path, much like a human runner: As it detects an approaching obstacle, it estimates that object’s height and distance. The robot gauges the best position from which to jump, and adjusts its stride to… Read More »

Ice rink with embedded dead fish sparks uproar

There was a backlash on social media about this. The owner said he just wanted to educate people about fish. He apologized and said he did not anticipate the negative reactions. The rink, which opened inside Space World amusement park in Kitakyushu, southern Japan on November 12, created the unusual fish display in an apparent… Read More »

Earth raises a plasma shield to battle solar storms

Earth can raise shields to protect itself against solar storms. For the first time, satellites and ground-based detectors have watched as the planet sends out a tendril of plasma to fight off blasts of charged solar matter. The discovery confirms a long-standing theory about Earth’s magnetic surroundings and offers us a way to keep track… Read More »

A New Map of How We Think: Top Brain/Bottom Brain

… research reveals that the top-brain system uses information about the surrounding environment (in combination with other sorts of information, such as emotional reactions and the need for food or drink) to figure out which goals to try to achieve. It actively formulates plans, generates expectations about what should happen when a plan is executed… Read More »

Bear In A Lamborghini Shuts Down LA Traffic

A man driving around with a pet bear in his Lamborghini shut down traffic on an LA street yesterday because he was driving around with a bear, a real bear, in his Lamborghini…. You can see another picture of the bear in the car right here. Surprisingly, a man claiming to be the owner of… Read More »

Down Syndrome Neurons Grown from Stem Cells Show Signature Problems

In new research published this week, Anita Bhattacharyya, a neuroscientist at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports on brain cells that were grown from skin cells of individuals with Down syndrome. “Even though Down syndrome is very common, it’s surprising how little we know about what goes wrong in the brain,” says… Read More »

Colossal new predatory dino terrorized early tyrannosaurs

This is an illustration of Siats meekerorum. Credit: Jorge GonzalesA new species of carnivorous dinosaur — one of the three largest ever discovered in North America — lived alongside and competed with small-bodied tyrannosaurs 98 million years ago. This newly discovered species, Siats meekerorum, (pronounced see-atch) was the apex predator of its time, and kept… Read More »

GMO labeling to be outlawed?

The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) is scheming to criminalize state-by-state GMO labeling laws in a deviously evil effort to keep consumers ignorant of what they’re eating. Remember, the GMA is the same organization that got caught running an illegal money laundering scheme in Washington state, secretly funneling money from big food manufacturers into a campaign… Read More »

What Will Humans Look Like in 100,000 Years?

Think you’re done evolving? You might want to think again. While homo sapiens has come a long way since the Stone Age, and modern medicine is ever-rapidly developing, new biological and psychological ailments enter our vocabularies all the time — many of them incurable. Not to mention, robots have taken over many formerly human occupations… Read More »

92 Years of Bigfoot Sightings Map

A Bigfoot sighting in Washington state. Sasquatch “evidence” in Pennsylvania. For years the legendary giant, hairy man-like creature has been, apparently, spotted. And yet, conclusive, scientific evidence has not been able to pin down the elusive character. Josh Stevens, a geographic information scientist, cartographer and PhD candidate at Pennsylvania State University, said “every now and… Read More »

Earth telescope captures images twice as sharp as Hubble

Telescope captures images twice as sharp as Hubble Astronomers say they are now able to capture images of the sky that are twice as sharp as those captured by the Hubble telescope. A team of scientists from the University of Arizona, Arcetri Observatory in Italy and the Carnegie Observatory developed the technology that will allow… Read More »

Centuries-old frozen plants revived

Plants that were frozen during the “Little Ice Age” centuries ago have been observed sprouting new growth, scientists say. Samples of 400-year-old plants known as bryophytes have flourished under laboratory conditions. Researchers say this back-from-the-dead trick has implications for how ecosystems recover from the planet’s cyclic long periods of ice coverage. The findings appear in… Read More »