Category Archives: Technology

Transparent Squishy Speaker Invention

This is not your typical loudspeaker. Researchers have unveiled a see-through speaker that conducts electricity, is elastic like skin and vibrates like Jell-O. The new device may one day show up in sound systems: Its designers imagine draping it like a transparent skin on the screen of an iPod to eliminate the need for speakers.… Read More »

LTE Cell Phone Radiation Affects Brain Activity in Cell Phone Users + Starlink to Kill the Earth?

Brain images pre- and post-LTE exposure The first study on the short-term effects of Long Term Evolution (LTE), the fourth generation cell phone technology, has been published online in the peer-reviewed journal, Clinical Neurophysiology. (1) In a controlled experiment, researchers exposed the right ear of 18 participants to LTE cellphone radiation for 30 minutes. The… Read More »

Math explains history: Simulation accurately captures the evolution of ancient complex societies

The question of how human societies evolve from small groups to the huge, anonymous and complex societies of today has been answered mathematically, accurately matching the historical record on the emergence of complex states in the ancient world. Intense warfare is the evolutionary driver of large complex societies, according to new research from a trans-disciplinary… Read More »

Users sue Linkedin over harvesting of email addresses

Four LinkedIn users have filed a lawsuit accusing the business-oriented social network of accessing their email accounts without permission, harvesting the addresses of their contacts and spamming those people with repeated invitations to join the service. In their most explosive claim, the plaintiffs say that LinkedIn is “breaking into” external email accounts, like Gmail or… Read More »

How Leon Foucault taught us to watch the world spin

Leon Foucault and his pendulum demonstrated the turning of the Earth. Google honored the French physicist with an interactive doodle. It’s easy to forget that while you read this article, you and your computer screen are racing through space at a nearly unimaginable speed. The earth constantly rotates on its axis at 1,037 miles per… Read More »

Archaeologists’ tricorder reveals objects’ ancient origins

Tricorder-style handheld scanners could help archaeologists uncover historical secrets without having to wait months for laboratory results. Researchers from Sheffield University have adapted technology used to identify materials in scrap metal yards and docks, in order to determine the geographical origin of certain stone tools in just 10 seconds. The portable scanner uses X-rays to… Read More »

UCI researchers fabricate new camouflage coating from squid protein

What can the U.S. military learn from a common squid? A lot about how to hide from enemies, according to researchers at UC Irvine’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering. As detailed in a study published online in Advanced Materials, they have created a biomimetic infrared camouflage coating inspired by Loliginidae, also known as pencil squids… Read More »

Massaging Vest Combats Stress While You Wear It

Grabbing a massage as you walk around town has never been so easy. A group of Cornell students recently invented an electric vest embedded with tiny motors intended to knead and massage the user’s back and shoulders. The vest, which was created in hopes of relieving stress linked to negative health effects, was even designed… Read More »

New Microplasma Device Could Potentially Revolutionize Archaeology

A team of researchers, including experts from Uppsala University in Sweden have developed a miniature device that they claim could revolutionize the way in which archaeologists date objects they discover in the field. The instrument in question is being described as a high-tech microplasma source that is capable of exciting matter in a controlled, efficient… Read More »

Virgin Galactic ship shakes its space-flight feathers

… The first vehicle purpose-built for carrying tourists into space has now tested not just its wings, but also its feathers. Although it still hasn’t reached space, Virgin Galactic’s SpaceshipTwo flew slightly longer and higher than it did on its first powered flight in April – and this time it also deployed a safety mechanism… Read More »

Robot spacecraft ready for launch to study moon dust, NASA says

Weather conditions were “looking real good” for NASA’s Friday night launch of a small robotic spacecraft on a mission to investigate the mysterious moon dust that Apollo astronauts encountered decades ago, a spokesman said. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer spacecraft, known as LADEE, is scheduled for launch at 11:27 p.m. EDT on Friday… Read More »

Earth telescope captures images twice as sharp as Hubble

Telescope captures images twice as sharp as Hubble Astronomers say they are now able to capture images of the sky that are twice as sharp as those captured by the Hubble telescope. A team of scientists from the University of Arizona, Arcetri Observatory in Italy and the Carnegie Observatory developed the technology that will allow… Read More »

RINGS propels satellites without propellants

Astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) are testing a new propulsion system … inside the station. While this might seem like the height of recklessness, this particular system doesn’t use rockets or propellants. Developed in the University of Maryland’s Space Power and Propulsion Laboratory, this new electromagnetic propulsion technology called the Resonant Inductive Near-field… Read More »

Fooling the AppStore one code-chunk at a time

A group of researchers presenting at Usenix last week turned up a startling new way to sneak malicious apps through the AppStore and onto iOS devices. By spreading malicious chunks of code through an apparently-innocuous app for activation later, the researchers say they were able to evade Apple’s test regime. The Georgia Tech-led team’s aim,… Read More »

Meet the NASA scientist devising a starship warp drive

To pave the way for rapid interstellar travel, NASA propulsion researcher Harold “Sonny” White plans to manipulate space-time in the lab The idea that nothing can exceed the speed of light limits our interstellar ambitions. How do we get round this? Within general relativity, there are two loopholes that allow you to go somewhere very… Read More »

Video: The Enigma Code

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncL2Fl6prH8 € The Enigma Code – YouTube. Some interesting history and basic tutorial about encryption.

Fukushima now in state of emergency, leaking 300 tons of radioactive water into the ocean daily

Japan’s nuclear watchdog has now declared the leak of radioactive water from Fukushima a “state of emergency.” Each day, 300 tons of radioactive water seeps into the ocean, and it’s now clear that TEPCO has engage in a two-and-a-half-year cover-up of immense magnitude. “I believe it’s been leaking into the ocean from the start of… Read More »

Drinking Water Might Just Make You Smarter

In case you’re suffering from severe writer’s block … here’s a handy tip to wake that brain up: drink water. The benefits of drinking water are well known, but a new study confirms that when you drink water, your brain works faster. Researchers at the University of East London School of Psychology in England discovered… Read More »

Star Trek deflector shield could protect Mars mission from cancer risk

A Star Trek style deflector shield that could protect deep-space astronauts, such as the much-discussed manned mission to Mars, from cancer-causing levels of radiation is in testing, researchers have revealed. The system, described as a “mini-magnetosphere” in reference to the Earth’s magnetic field which protects us from solar radiation, is the handiwork of the Rutherford… Read More »

New material holds big energy hope

A new material that can store large amounts of energy with very little energy loss has been developed by researchers at the Australian National University. The material has practical applications in renewable energy storage, electric cars and defence and space technologies. “Dielectric materials are used to make fundamental electrical components called capacitors, which store energy,”… Read More »

Phoning Firefox: Browser now makes Web calls

Mozilla today shipped Firefox 22, enabling the in-browser audio-video calling standard WebRTC and switching on a new JavaScript module that promises to speed up Web apps. The update also included patches for 17 security vulnerabilities, seven of them marked “critical.” Mozilla highlighted several of the changes in Firefox 22, notably the default support for WebRTC… Read More »

Three days in sugar solution gives see-through tissue sample

In a Nature Neuroscience report posted online yesterday, Japanese researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology show how they’ve grabbed a ball tossed by Stanford psychiatrist/ neuroscientist/bioengineer Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, and run with it. In April, Deisseroth’s team announcedan amazing new method for transforming biological tissues (in this case, the brain of a… Read More »

Quantum-Tunneling Computers: Answers faster than light?

… Nerval’s Lobster writes “The powerful, reliable combination of transistors and semiconductors in computer processors could give way to systems built on the way electrons misbehave, all of it contained in circuits that warp even the most basic rules of physics. Rather than relying on a predictable flow of electrons that appear to know whether… Read More »

How to fit 1,000TB of data onto a 12cm optical disc

Just before the weekend I read about a new technique which can be used to shoehorn around 1,000TB of data onto a “DVD disc”. This is quite a feat and it was achieved by circumnavigating some laws of physics with a technique which uses two different coloured light beams to selectively cancel each other out… Read More »

Living with no pulse, How doctors reinvented the heart

The ancient Egyptians believed, as some modern people do, that the mind exists in the heart instead of the brain. I guess they would claim that anesthesia works on the heart and the changes seen in the brain are unrelated to consciousness. There is proof, however, that consciousness does not reside in the heart: Living… Read More »

Scientists transform cement into liquid metal

It’s not the same as turning lead into gold, but scientists at the Illinois-based Argonne National Laboratory and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8 have developed a method for turning cement into a liquid metal semiconductor. The process sounds like a mad scientist’s invention. It involves equipment like an aerodynamic levitator and a carbon dioxide… Read More »

Microalgae produce more oil faster for energy, food or products

Scientists have described technology that accelerates microalgae’s ability to produce many different types of renewable oils for fuels, chemicals, foods and personal-care products within days using standard industrial fermentation. The presentation was part of the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on April 7. Walter Rakitsky, Ph.D, explained that microalgae… Read More »

Does Probability Come from Quantum Physics?

Does Probability Come from Quantum Physics? — Ever since Austrian scientist Erwin Schrodinger put his unfortunate cat in a box, his fellow physicists have been using something called quantum theory to explain and understand the nature of waves and particles. But a new paper by physics professor Andreas Albrecht and graduate student Dan Phillips at… Read More »