Category Archives: Survival

A hunk of sea ice bigger than India has vanished

Sea ice off the coast of Antarctica and the Arctic hit record lows in November, and scientists are now reporting that, as of December 4, we’ve lost 3.76 million square kilometres of the stuff – more than the total area of India. As startling as that is, at this point, we shouldn’t really be surprised… Read More »

Cheap World War I antisceptc may save your life

Acriflavine, an antiseptic used in WWI hospitals could be the key to fighting antibiotic resistance – one of the current biggest threats to global health.€ Seven decades ago this simple antiseptic made from coal tar was replaced by penicillin after the war. It fights both viral and bacterial infections in an entirely different way – one… Read More »

Video: Survival using artificial glaciers

… Scientist, engineer and teacher Sonam Wangchuk, born in the northern, arid highland region of Ladakh located in India, is proposing the building of “artificial glacial ice towers” that will help locals adapt to these unpredictable changes brought on by a warming climate. Built using vertically placed pipes that shoot out glacial meltwater during the… Read More »

Fighting superbug bacteria with other bacteria

Want to save 10 million people? Find a solution to superbugs. … If things keep going as they are, antibiotic-resistant superbugs are expected to kill 10 million people by 2050, and so far, we have no solution. But researchers have found that we could actually fight fire with fire – a predatory bacterium has been… Read More »

Thunderstorm Asthma is real, and a killer

You’d think that rain cleans the air, but not always. Two Australians have died and more than 2,000 others experienced breathing difficulties after a rare outbreak of ‘thunderstorm asthma’ on Monday – a phenomenon where weather changes brought on by storms can trigger widespread asthma attacks and breathing problems. The condition is incredibly rare, but… Read More »

Researchers: Ten Percent of Ozone Pollution in California is from Asia

Approximately 10 percent of ozone pollution in California’s San Joaquin Valley is estimated to be coming from outside of the state’s borders, particularly from Asia, according to preliminary research presented today, March 31, by the University of California, Davis. Secondhand smog from Asia and other international sources is finding its way into one of the… Read More »

Earth raises a plasma shield to battle solar storms

Earth can raise shields to protect itself against solar storms. For the first time, satellites and ground-based detectors have watched as the planet sends out a tendril of plasma to fight off blasts of charged solar matter. The discovery confirms a long-standing theory about Earth’s magnetic surroundings and offers us a way to keep track… Read More »

Fukushima cleanup brainstorming

Image from FukushimaBlog Fukushima. Everyone should be working in some way to fix this deadly problem, and I don’t mean just sending money to relief workers , although that’s nice. There are three different big problems at Fukushima: missing reactor cores, waste water, and fuel rods. Any one of these is a global threat that… Read More »

Japanese government seeks approval to dump Fukushima groundwater into sea

The government on Monday sought approval of a nationwide fisheries federation to dump groundwater at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex into the sea on condition that the water’s contamination level is far below the legal limit. During talks with the head of the National Federation of Fisheries Co-operative Associations, industry ministry officials explained that… Read More »

Severe Drought Has U.S. West Fearing Worst

The punishing drought that has swept California is now threatening the state’s drinking water supply. With no sign of rain, 17 rural communities providing water to 40,000 people are in danger of running out within 60 to 120 days. State officials said that the number was likely to rise in the months ahead after the… Read More »

Drinking water from air humidity

Not a plant to be seen, the desert ground is too dry. But the air contains water, and research scientists have found a way of obtaining drinking water from air humidity. The system is based completely on renewable energy and is therefore autonomous. Cracks permeate the dried-out desert ground, the landscape bears testimony to the… Read More »

Surprising diversity in aging revealed in nature

For several species mortality increases with age — as expected by evolutionary scientists. This pattern is seen in most mammal species including humans and killer whales, but also in invertebrates like water fleas. However, other species experience a decrease in mortality as they age, and in some cases mortality drops all the way up to… Read More »

Vast Freshwater Reserves Discovered Under Ocean Floor

Massive reserves of “freshwater” are buried beneath the seabed on continental shelves around the world, including off Australia, China, North America and South Africa.This is the conclusion of a new study by a team of Australian scientists that appears in this week’s issue of the journal, Nature.Based on an analysis of seafloor water studies conducted… Read More »

The UN vs the Asteroids

… The UN voted last week to adopt a proposal from the Association of Space Explorers (ASE) to form an “International Asteroid Warning Group” to defend the planet from asteroids, Scientific American first reported. Member states will use the group to share information on Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and pull together a response to a… Read More »

Hunter, 72, survives 19 days in snowy California wilderness

A 72-year-old California deer hunter was recovering Monday after surviving on squirrels and packing leaves around him for warmth for nearly three weeks while he was lost and alone in the snowy wilderness, authorities said. Gene Penaflor was discovered by hunters on Saturday after 19 days in the Mendocino National Forest in the Coastal Mountain… Read More »

Lead-based underwear for Fukushima protection

A Japanese company has invented carbon wetsuits and lead-based underwear that can protect against radiation amid the growing aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear crisis. It comes as Japan fights to stop the flow of radioactive water leaking into the sea. Three of the Fukushima plant”s nuclear reactors were damaged by an earthquake-triggered tsunami on March… Read More »

Wonder drug and supercharged immune cells offer cancer hope

GENETICALLY “supercharging” immune cells, and combining this with a new wonder drug, offers a new way to boost the body’s cancer defences, Melbourne researchers have found. Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre researchers hope the new treatment combination, tested successfully in animals, will eventually allow cancer patients to be immunised against relapses. The team combined the anti-PD-1… Read More »

Earth to end in 1.7bn years

We’ve got 1.75 billion years before the planet becomes uninhabitable for humans, say scientists. That will give our descendants plenty of time to work on the real-life Star Trek technology — and relocate humanity to another planet. It may mean that moving to Mars will be our best chance of survival, according to a study… Read More »

Fukushima now in state of emergency, leaking 300 tons of radioactive water into the ocean daily

Japan’s nuclear watchdog has now declared the leak of radioactive water from Fukushima a “state of emergency.” Each day, 300 tons of radioactive water seeps into the ocean, and it’s now clear that TEPCO has engage in a two-and-a-half-year cover-up of immense magnitude. “I believe it’s been leaking into the ocean from the start of… Read More »

‘Invisible’ Wetsuits Confuse Attacking Sharks

A company in Australia has developed a range of wetsuits which they say renders the wearer nearly invisible or repulsive to sharks. It is hoped the suits will help prevent attacks on divers, surfers and even swimmers who wear them in coastal areas that are shark infested. They incorporate patented Shark Attack Mitigation System technology… Read More »

104 Studies: Pesticides linked Parkinson’s

… A recent meta-analysis published in the journal Neurology, examined data from 104 studies published between 1975 and 2011, in search for a potential link between pesticides and Parkinson’s disease. As many previous studies, it found one… Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder in which neurons in a region within your brain responsible for normal… Read More »

Centuries-old frozen plants revived

Plants that were frozen during the “Little Ice Age” centuries ago have been observed sprouting new growth, scientists say. Samples of 400-year-old plants known as bryophytes have flourished under laboratory conditions. Researchers say this back-from-the-dead trick has implications for how ecosystems recover from the planet’s cyclic long periods of ice coverage. The findings appear in… Read More »

3D Printer Used To Save Baby’s Life

… Bryan and April Gionfriddo have a 6-month-old baby, Kaiba, who suddenly couldn’t breathe due to his bronchus suddenly collapsing. The baby’s parents took him to the emergency room where it was determined Kaiba would require a splint being inserted in order to hold open his bronchial tube, to hopefully allow the tissue to grow… Read More »

80-year-old becomes oldest man to climb Mount Everest

An 80-year-old Japanese man on Thursday became the oldest person to reach the top of Mt. Everest, officials said. Yuichiro Miura reached the top of Everest Thursday morning with his physician son Gota, mountaineering official Gyanendra Shrestha said from the base of Everest. Miura’s achievement eclipses that of a Nepali man who climbed Everest at… Read More »

How to Grow Your Own Organic Food in Small Spaces

Sprouts are an authentic “super” food that many overlook or have long stopped using. In addition to their superior nutritional profile, sprouts are really easy to grow if you’re an apartment dweller, as they don’t require an outdoor garden. A powerhouse of nutrition, sprouts can contain up to 30 times the nutrition of organic vegetables… Read More »