Category Archives: Biology

Video: Hoxsey: The “Quack” who Cured Cancer

What was the formula?€  Wikipedia says this: Hoxsey herbal treatments include a topical paste of antimony, zinc and bloodroot, arsenic, sulfur, and talc for external treatments, and a liquid tonic of licorice, red clover, burdock root, Stillingia root, barberry, Cascara, prickly ash bark, buckthorn bark, and potassium iodide for internal consumption.[17] In addition to the… Read More »

Monkeys killed by Airborne Ebola

Ebola can spread by air in cold, dry weather common to the U.S. but not West Africa, presenting a "possible, serious threat" to the public, according to two studies by U.S. Army scientists. After successfully exposing monkeys to airborne Ebola, which "caused a rapidly fatal disease in 4-5 days," scientists with the U.S. Army Medical… Read More »

New hope for diabetics from babies who make too much insulin

16-Jan-2014 Targeting a cell cycle inhibitor promotes beta cell replication One of the factors underlying the development of type 2 diabetes is loss of β cell mass, resulting in decreased insulin production. Once lost, β cell mass cannot be restored. In contrast, infants with focal hyperinsulinism of infancy exhibit rapid expansion of the β cell… Read More »

Vermont passes GMO labeling law

Senator David Zuckerman and Representative Carolyn Partridge describe the amazing efforts, which spanned more than a decade, resulting in this unprecedented, game-changing new law…. Here's the quick facts: 1. Starting July 1, 2016, products sold in Vermont that contain more than 0.9% GMO content contamination will require a statement on the label indicating that genetic… Read More »

The Eagle Cam

Both cameras are equipped with infrared (IR) technology that allows viewing at night. This light spectrum is outside the viewing range of both bald eagles and humans. When on location at night, no light source can be seen by the naked eye. In September 2013, our bald eagle couple returned to the Berry College campus… Read More »

The pink fairy armadillo of Argentina.

… in the deserts of Argentina. Here dwells the remarkable pink fairy armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus), a 5-inch-long, quarter-pound critter with a rosy shell atop silky white hair. This smallest of all armadillos spends almost its entire life burrowing through the earth, hunting various invertebrates and chewing up plant matter. It is a rarely seen, almost… Read More »

Spiders build sculptures of other spiders

Two species of spider have been discovered building life-like spider effigies from dead insects, leaves, & twigs. What’s remarkable is that one species is in Peru, the other in the Philippines. Scientists think the spider sculptures either help lure prey or scare off predators. Perhaps the spiders are just very lonely. Or even more disturbing,… Read More »

Caveman With Blue Eyes Shocks Scientists

Scientists examining the DNA of ancient remains find surprising new evidence of how early Europeans had dark skin and blue eyes. Image: An artist’s impression of the face of a 7,000-year-old man, reconstructed from his skeleton. His remains were discovered in a cold subterranean cave 5,000ft below sea level in the Cantabrian mountains of northwest… Read More »

Are there any known virgin births? Sort of, but not really

Parthenogenesis is a form of asexual reproduction in which growth and development of embryos occur without fertilization. In animals, parthenogenesis means development of an embryo from an unfertilized egg cell. Are there any case reports of virgin births in the medical literature? Sort of. According to a 1995 report in the journal Nature Genetics, a… Read More »

Parasitic DNA proliferates in aging tissues

The genomes of organisms from humans to corn are replete with “parasitic” strands of DNA that, when not suppressed, copy themselves and spread throughout the genome, potentially affecting health. Earlier this year Brown University researchers found that these “retrotransposable elements” were increasingly able to break free of the genome’s control in cultures of human cells.… Read More »

Cells from the eye are inkjet printed for the first time

A group of researchers from the UK have used inkjet printing technology to successfully print cells taken from the eye for the very first time. The breakthrough, which has been detailed in a paper published today, 18 December, in IOP Publishing’s journal Biofabrication, could lead to the production of artificial tissue grafts made from the… Read More »

Kidney grown from stem cells by Australian scientists

A kidney grown in a dish as seen under the microscope – link Scientists in Australia have grown the world’s first kidney from stem cells — a tiny organ which could eventually help to reduce the wait for transplants. The breakthrough, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, followed years of research and involved the… Read More »

Surprising diversity in aging revealed in nature

For several species mortality increases with age — as expected by evolutionary scientists. This pattern is seen in most mammal species including humans and killer whales, but also in invertebrates like water fleas. However, other species experience a decrease in mortality as they age, and in some cases mortality drops all the way up to… Read More »

Your brain is eating itself constantly

A type of brain cell once thought to be little more than the neuron’s supportive sidekick may have a lead role in pruning the electrochemical connections that are crucial to brain development, learning, memory and cognition, a new study suggests. Astrocytes, a type of glial cell, turn out to be veritable Pac-men, steadily gobbling up… Read More »