Category Archives: Archaeology

‘World’s oldest calendar’ discovered in Scottish field

Archaeologists believe they have discovered the world’s oldest lunar “calendar” in an Aberdeenshire field.Excavations of a field at Crathes Castle found a series of 12 pits which appear to mimic the phases of the moon and track lunar months.A team led by the University of Birmingham suggests the ancient monument was created by hunter-gatherers about… Read More »

Ancient Maya City Discovered in Mexico

It must be World Discover-Lost-Cities Week! Barely a week after we heard the exciting news of a lost city found in Cambodia, comes the announcement of an ancient Maya city discovered in Mexico’s Central Lowlands. The site has been dubbed Chact√∫n, “Red Stone”; one of 19 stelae unearthed so far bears inscriptions detailing the ruler… Read More »

Discovery of Oldest Primate Skeleton, Ancestor of Humans and Apes

An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of the world’s oldest known fossil primate skeleton representing a previously unknown genus and species named Archicebus achilles. The fossil was unearthed from an ancient lake bed in central China’s Hubei Province, near the course of the modern Yangtze River. In addition to being the oldest… Read More »

Cave paintings in Mexico: Carvings uncovered in Burgos

Archaeologists in Mexico have found 4,926 well-preserved cave paintings in the north-eastern region of Burgos. The images in red, yellow, black and white depict humans, animals and insects, as well as skyscapes and abstract scenes. The paintings were found in 11 different sites – but the walls of one cave were covered with 1,550 scenes.… Read More »

Afghanistan’s heritage is at stake

South east of Kabul lies Logar, the latest province to backslide into the clutches of insurgency and Taliban rule. Upon the region’s barren landscape sits a cluster of rocky foothills known collectively as Mes Aynak. To the Afghan and Chinese governments, Mes Aynak is the site of massive copper reserves, the world’s second largest, with… Read More »

Secret streets of Britain’s Atlantis are revealed

  Image: A 3-D visualization of underwater ruins of St Katherine’s Church, Dunwich, UK. A University of Southampton professor has carried out the most detailed analysis ever of the archaeological remains of the lost medieval town of Dunwich, dubbed ‘Britain’s Atlantis’. Funded and supported by English Heritage, and using advanced underwater imaging techniques, the project… Read More »

Robot finds mysterious spheres in ancient temple

The archaeologists used a 3-foot-long, remote-controlled robot which was able to explore the last part of the tunnel. Hundreds of mysterious spheres lie beneath the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, an ancient six-level step pyramid just 30 miles from Mexico City. The enigmatic spheres were found during an archaeological dig using a camera-equipped robot at… Read More »

Two million-year-old creature had mix of ape, human traits

A 2 million-year-old ancestor of man had a mixture of ape and human-like features that allowed it to hike vast distances on two legs with as much ease as it could scurry up trees, according to research published on Friday. Discovered in cave near Johannesburg in 2008, the fossils of a species named “Australopithecus sediba”… Read More »

Ancient Clockwork

In 1900, a worn bronze machine was hauled from an ancient Greek shipwreck. With dozens of crumbling gears, the machine puzzled experts for more than a century. This documentary follows researchers who have come to suspect the machine, known as the Antikythera mechanism, is a miniature planetarium that tracked the Sun and the Moon and… Read More »

Massive prehistoric bird extinction linked to human colonization

Research by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville professor has found that about a thousand bird species became extinct following human colonization. Research by Alison Boyer, a research assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology, and an international team studied the extinction rates of nonperching land birds in the Pacific Islands from 700 to 3,500 years… Read More »

Mars Could Have Supported Life, NASA Says

Several billion years ago, Mars may well have been a pleasant place for tiny microbes to live, with plenty of water as well as minerals that could have served as food, NASA scientists said Tuesday at a news conference on the latest findings from their Mars rover. But they have yet to find signs that… Read More »