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The True Strange News Archives is a grab-bag of interesting stuff. Discover and explore unusual news, science breakthroughs, odd ideas and unlikely true events from around the world.

Cheap World War I antisceptc may save your life

Acriflavine, an antiseptic used in WWI hospitals could be the key to fighting antibiotic resistance – one of the current biggest threats to global health.€ Seven decades ago this simple antiseptic made from coal tar was replaced by penicillin after the war. It fights both viral and bacterial infections in an entirely different way – one… Read More »

Vitamin C helps control gene activity in stem cells

Vitamin C affects whether genes are switched on or off inside mouse stem cells, and may thereby play a previously unknown and fundamental role in helping to guide normal development in mice, humans and other animals, a scientific team led by UC San Francisco researchers has discovered.The researchers found that vitamin C assists enzymes that… Read More »

Giant face photographed in killer volcano

At least 14 people killed as Mount Sinabung in Sumatra province releases clouds of noxious gas and lava. An Indonesian volcano that has been rumbling for months has witnessed a major eruption, killing at least 14 people, officials say. Among the dead on Mount Sinabung were a local television journalist and four high-school students and… Read More »

Scientists claim to have found evidence of ALIEN LIFE

Balloon sent to edge of atmosphere picks up organisms “that can only have come from space. British scientists believe they have found evidence alien life after sending a balloon to the edge of space. The team of scientists sent a balloon 27km into the stratosphere and captured small biological organisms they say can only have… Read More »

Brain overload explains missing childhood memories

Scientists – and parents – have long wondered why we don’t remember anything that happened before age 3. As all parents know, no matter how momentous an event is in a toddler’s life, the memory soon drifts away and within months there isn’t even a wisp of it left. Now a new study shows that… Read More »

Circuses to be Banned from Using Wild Animals

[British] Government publishes plans to ban use of wild animals in travelling circuses in England from 1 December 2015 Circuses will be banned from using wild animals in their shows under new government proposals that have been published after a long campaign. Politicians and animal welfare groups have repeatedly called for the measure and in… Read More »

What exactly was the “Dover Demon”?

The bizarre tale begins at 10:30 p.m. on April 21 as three 17-year-olds, Bill Bartlett, Mike Mazzocca and Andy Brodie, are driving north on Farm Street. Bartlett, who’s behind the wheel of a Volkswagen, spots something creeping along a low wall of loose stones on the left side of the road. At first he thinks… Read More »

U.S. begins flying deportees to Mexico City

U.S. immigration authorities have begun flying deportees deep into Mexico in an effort to discourage them from trying to return. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says the first of twice-weekly flights from El Paso, Texas, to Mexico City left Thursday with 133 deportees aboard, all men. ICE spokeswoman Nicole Navas says the flights will accommodate… Read More »

80-year-old becomes oldest man to climb Mount Everest

An 80-year-old Japanese man on Thursday became the oldest person to reach the top of Mt. Everest, officials said. Yuichiro Miura reached the top of Everest Thursday morning with his physician son Gota, mountaineering official Gyanendra Shrestha said from the base of Everest. Miura’s achievement eclipses that of a Nepali man who climbed Everest at… Read More »

Environmental Toxins Linked to Childhood Obesity

Are toys, pacifiers and even shampoo driving the epidemic of childhood obesity? Researchers from the Children’s Environmental Health Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York have found an association between a class of chemical substances known as “phthalates” and obesity in young children. Phthalates are man-made chemicals that disrupt your endocrine system… Read More »

Mars soil analysis reveals surprising amount of water

Analysis of Martian soil by NASA’s ongoing Mars Curiosity rover turned up a surprising amount of water, as well as a chemical that will make a search for life more complicated, scientists said on Thursday. A scoop of fine-grained sand collected by the rover shortly after its August 2012 touchdown showed the soil contains about… Read More »

Living Dinosaurs Seen in Modern Times?

These are great photos, but I think you’d be right to suspect photoshop or other shenanigans. Are Living Dinosaurs Seen in Modern Times? “Reports of strange flying reptiles, some quite large, have continued well into modern times. As we shall see, reports of pteranodons, dragons, thunderbirds, and other similar monsters, are relatively common. … Giant… Read More »

Why Some People Lack Wisdom Teeth

Many people have suffered from impacted third molars, also known as wisdom teeth. But there are also a lucky few who are missing a wisdom tooth or two (or even all four). Why do some people have wisdom teeth, while others don’t? The answer, partly hinted at in new research presented here at the annual… Read More »

Subterranean Telescope Sees Humanity’s First Cosmic Neutrino?

Catching a glimpse of even regular neutrinos – low-energy particles generated in the atmosphere – is difficult enough, but spotting a “cosmic neutrino” left over from the Big Bang has been downright impossible. That is until this cubic kilometer buried under Antartica’s frozen wastes started looking. Known as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, this $279 million… Read More »

Scientists discover dark lightning

… scientists recently discovered something mind-bending about lightning: Sometimes its flashes are invisible, just sudden pulses of unexpectedly powerful radiation. It’s what Joseph Dwyer, a lightning researcher at the Florida Institute of Technology, has termed dark lightning. Unknown to Franklin but now clear to a growing roster of lightning researchers and astronomers is that along… Read More »

Spiders build sculptures of other spiders

Two species of spider have been discovered building life-like spider effigies from dead insects, leaves, & twigs. What’s remarkable is that one species is in Peru, the other in the Philippines. Scientists think the spider sculptures either help lure prey or scare off predators. Perhaps the spiders are just very lonely. Or even more disturbing,… Read More »

Did Homer Simpson Solve Fermat’s Last Theorem?

In an episode of The Simpson’s called The Wizard of Evergreen Terrace, Homer appears to write a valid solution to defeat Fermat’s Last Theorem on a blackboard. But given that Fermat’s last theorem is proven, is it real? Well, obviously not–but in this video mathematician and author Simon Singh explains why he wasn’t actually too… Read More »

Taiwan Lawmakers Brawl Over Nuclear Plant Bill

Taiwanese lawmakers have exchanged punches and thrown water at each other ahead of an expected vote authorizing a referendum on whether to go ahead with the construction of a fourth power plant. Friday’s fracas pitted the pro-referendum forces of President Ma Ying-jeou’s ruling Nationalist Party against strongly anti-nuclear forces affiliated with the main opposition Democratic… Read More »

This Optical Illusion Lets You See Your Own Brain Waves

The pinwheel-like drawing above is nothing but black and white lines. When you look at it the right way, though, something strange and beautiful happens: it begins to flicker. You may think it’s just a regular old optical illusion at first, but actually, you’re looking at your very own brain waves. To see the optical… Read More »

Researchers find high-fructose corn syrup may be tied to worldwide collapse of bee colonies

A team of entomologists from the University of Illinois has found a possible link between the practice of feeding commercial honeybees high-fructose corn syrup and the collapse of honeybee colonies around the world. The team outlines their research and findings in a paper they’ve had published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.… Read More »

Light from nothing

‘Virtual particles’ can have real physical effects. A vacuum might seem like empty space, but scientists have discovered a new way to seemingly get something from that nothingness, such as light. And the finding could ultimately help scientists build incredibly powerful quantum computers or shed light on the earliest moments in the universe’s history. Quantum… Read More »

Video: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 by 167 theremin nesting dolls

The theremin instrument was invented by Laeon Theremin in 1920. The sound is like that of the Tannerin, an electrotheremin which appeared in The Beach Boys hit Good Vibrations. In the musical performance below, the performers are playing an invention of Masami Takeuchi. € Takeuchi placed the frequency antenna of a theremin inside a Russian nesting… Read More »

Fukushima now in state of emergency, leaking 300 tons of radioactive water into the ocean daily

Japan’s nuclear watchdog has now declared the leak of radioactive water from Fukushima a “state of emergency.” Each day, 300 tons of radioactive water seeps into the ocean, and it’s now clear that TEPCO has engage in a two-and-a-half-year cover-up of immense magnitude. “I believe it’s been leaking into the ocean from the start of… Read More »

South Korea bans Japanese fish

… South Korea announced on Friday that it was banning all fish imports from along Japan’s northeastern coast because of what officials called growing public worry over radioactive water leaking into the Pacific Ocean near the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Fisheries in Fukushima prefecture are nearly all closed, and fish caught in nearby… Read More »

Extraterrestrial Intelligence Overwhelmingly Likely to be Post-Biological

During an epoch of dramatic climate change 200,000 years ago, Homo sapiens (modern humans) evolved in Africa. Several leading scientists are asking: Is the human species entering a new evolutionary, post-biological inflection point? Paul Davies, a British-born theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astrobiologist and Director of the Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science and Co-Director of… Read More »

Brain Protein Is a Key to ‘Senior Moments,’ Study Finds

A protein in the brain could hold the key to reversing the age-related memory loss that causes “senior moments” of forgetfulness, Columbia University researchers report. Deficiency of a protein called RbAp48 in the hippocampus appears to significantly contribute to the memory loss that creeps up on you as you age, said study co-author Dr. Scott… Read More »

Frakensparrow: Robot created from dead bird

A dead bird animated by off-the-shelf robotics helped US biologists study behaviour in the swamp sparrow species. Scientists at Duke University in North Carolina worked with engineering students and a taxidermist to operate the wings of a deceased swamp sparrow. They programmed simple Picaxe computer chips, and built a tiny linear motor to fit inside… Read More »