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The True Strange News Archives is a grab-bag of interesting stuff. Discover and explore unusual news, science breakthroughs, odd ideas and unlikely true events from around the world.

Florida family finds $300,000 worth of sunken treasure

A Florida family who spends their time together hunting for treasure struck it rich over the weekend, hauling up an estimated $300,000 worth of gold from an historic wreckage in the Atlantic Ocean. Via Reuters: Oddly Enough Quite a find and it sounds like a great family pasttime.

Video: M-Disc: 1,000 year back up available now.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1zKZISYjZU As technology rapidly advances, we’re living longer, doing more, creating more memories and recording more data. Every scrapbooker, business owner, photographer, every person fears losing the legacy they have spent their lifetime creating. M-DISC© eliminates that fear. Once written, your documents, medical records, photos, videos and data will last up to 1,000 years. “Just… Read More »

Math explains history: Simulation accurately captures the evolution of ancient complex societies

The question of how human societies evolve from small groups to the huge, anonymous and complex societies of today has been answered mathematically, accurately matching the historical record on the emergence of complex states in the ancient world. Intense warfare is the evolutionary driver of large complex societies, according to new research from a trans-disciplinary… Read More »

Your brain is eating itself constantly

A type of brain cell once thought to be little more than the neuron’s supportive sidekick may have a lead role in pruning the electrochemical connections that are crucial to brain development, learning, memory and cognition, a new study suggests. Astrocytes, a type of glial cell, turn out to be veritable Pac-men, steadily gobbling up… Read More »

Kentucky Police Set Up ‘Eating While Driving’ Checkpoints

… Kentucky State Police will be on the lookout for people who eat while they drive as part of Operation RAID, which will include checkpoints targeting “distracted drivers,” despite the fact that eating while driving is not banned in Kentucky. Operation R.A.I.D. (Remove Aggressive, Impaired and Distracted drivers from Kentucky Roadways), which starts this month,… Read More »

Scientists ‘Turn Off’ Sensation of Cold

Scientists at the University of Southern California have found a way to turn off the neuron responsible for sensing cold in mice, and it could help humans who have extreme sensitivities to cold temperatures. The neuron channel, called TRPM8, is responsible for sensing “normal cold responses in mammals,” according to David McKenny, the neurobiologist responsible… Read More »

Video: The True Size of Alaska Revealed!

To draw shapes from a globe on a flat surface, you have to distort things. One of the trade offs with the Mercator projection maps we are most familiar with is that land masses at the top and bottom of the map appear larger than they are. In this map, the actual size of the… Read More »

Synthetic DNA Created, Evolves on Its Own

Step aside, DNA–new synthetic compounds called XNAs can also store and copy genetic information, a new study says. And, in a “big advancement,” these artificial compounds can also be made to evolve in the lab, according to study co-author John Chaputof the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. (See “Evolution vs. Intelligent Design: 6 Bones… Read More »

Back when the earth had two moons

The theory that the Earth was born moonless and was hit by a Mars-sized plant, ejecting into space material that became our moon does not explain why the far side of the moon is so different from the side we see. Some researchers say our planet once had two moons. The missing satellite might still… Read More »

Archaeologists’ tricorder reveals objects’ ancient origins

Tricorder-style handheld scanners could help archaeologists uncover historical secrets without having to wait months for laboratory results. Researchers from Sheffield University have adapted technology used to identify materials in scrap metal yards and docks, in order to determine the geographical origin of certain stone tools in just 10 seconds. The portable scanner uses X-rays to… Read More »

Seahorses stalk their prey by stealth

The beautiful creatures are famously bad swimmers, but they have a secret weapon to sneak up on their prey. Their peculiar snouts are shaped to create very few ripples in the water, effectively cloaking them as they creep up and pounce on tiny crustaceans. To their victims, seahorses are more like sea monsters, say scientists… Read More »

Perfect pitch may not be so ‘perfect’

… People classified with perfect pitch may not actually be as in tune with the notes they hear as they think. Played a long piece of music, a study group failed to notice when scientists turned the tones ever so slightly flat. They then misidentified in-tune sounds as being sharp. Researchers say it demonstrates the… Read More »

TV Reporter Infiltrates Raelian sect

“Among the more peculiar beliefs is that man was created in laboratories by extra-terrestrials. Rael sees himself as their last prophet, while also defending human cloning and sexuality which knows no bounds. Rael is surrounded by his “angels,” a “harem of 30 to 40 very pretty young women who have sworn in writing never to… Read More »

Are the Rich Jerks? See the Science

The rich really are different from you or me. They’re more likely to behave unethically. That’s the finding of a group of studies by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The research shows that people of higher socioeconomic status are more likely to break traffic laws, lie in negotiations, take valued goods from others,… Read More »

Memory-boosting chemical is identified in mice

Memory improved in mice injected with a small, drug-like molecule discovered by UCSF San Francisco researchers studying how cells respond to biological stress. The same biochemical pathway the molecule acts on might one day be targeted in humans to improve memory, according to the senior author of the study, Peter Walter, PhD, UCSF professor of… Read More »

Severe Drought Has U.S. West Fearing Worst

The punishing drought that has swept California is now threatening the state’s drinking water supply. With no sign of rain, 17 rural communities providing water to 40,000 people are in danger of running out within 60 to 120 days. State officials said that the number was likely to rise in the months ahead after the… Read More »

Grey Hair Treatment Discovered By Scientists

Scientists found people who are going grey develop “massive oxidative stress” via an accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the hair follicle, which causes hair to bleach itself from the inside out.According to the FASEB Journal, the team, which includes experts from Bradford University’s School of Life Sciences, discovered the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide can be… Read More »

Vitamin C helps control gene activity in stem cells

Vitamin C affects whether genes are switched on or off inside mouse stem cells, and may thereby play a previously unknown and fundamental role in helping to guide normal development in mice, humans and other animals, a scientific team led by UC San Francisco researchers has discovered.The researchers found that vitamin C assists enzymes that… Read More »

See ghosts? There may be a medical reason

Spooky footsteps, faint figures, the feeling of being watched — these unsettling signs of a ghost are as familiar to us as the goose bumps on the back of our arm (or neck). But are there physiological explanations for those things that go bump in the night? … “ghosts” are often the result of pranks,… Read More »

Stark Love: Iron Man Three Grabs the Global Gold

The kids keep pestering Tony Stark about his last adventure, in The Avengers, but he doesn’t want to talk about it: he’s preoccupied with his brand-new world-saving mission. Tony needn’t have worried about the comparisons. Iron Man Three, starring Robert Downey Jr. as the brilliant, arrogant industrialist, earned $175.3 million at North American theaters, according… Read More »

NASA Goes Low-Tech: Sends Balloon to Study Comet ISON

As stargazers keep their hopes up for an awesome show from ISON, dubbed the “comet of the century,” a balloon NASA sent into space is intended to bring back more information about the celestial event. But this is not your average balloon. At 671 feet tall, NASA’s balloon – named BRRISON, which stands for Balloon… Read More »

Fish going about on land?

Can any modern day fish go about on land? Yes. Some fish spend most of their time out of the water. “This photo, taken from the Maryland Department of National Resources (MDDNR) web site shows the air breathing, land walking snakehead fish. A man in Los Angeles was arrested for allegedly selling a live snakehead… Read More »

Ice rink with embedded dead fish sparks uproar

There was a backlash on social media about this. The owner said he just wanted to educate people about fish. He apologized and said he did not anticipate the negative reactions. The rink, which opened inside Space World amusement park in Kitakyushu, southern Japan on November 12, created the unusual fish display in an apparent… Read More »

Bizarre New Creature Confounds Chilean Researchers

According to the Terra.cl website, the creature has a large skull, two arms, long fingers and two legs and stands about 2.8 inches tall. A baby chupacabra? (See our article on them.) Quoted in the article above is Dr. Mario Dussuel “a psychiatrist who studies abduction cases.” – parascope.com I recently read about chupacabra eggs… Read More »

New Method of Finding Planets Scores First Discovery

“Einstein’s planet,” formally known as Kepler-76b, is a “hot Jupiter” that orbits its star every 1.5 days. Its diameter is about 25 percent larger than Jupiter and it weighs twice as much. This artist’s conception shows Kepler-76b orbiting its host star, which has been tidally distorted into a slight football shape (exaggerated here for effect).… Read More »

Chupacabra is not a Coyote with Mange

Here’s an interesting clue about the chupacabra. I found this quote about mange interesting regarding the Elmendorf beast: “Stacy spent twenty years working with a veterinarian and as a zookeeper for five years, so some of her expertise came in handy on this visit. She debunked the mange theory. ‘This was not a secondary infection,’… Read More »

Video: 13-year-old builds working nuclear fusion reactor

  Not many 13-year-olds would describe themselves as an “amateur nuclear scientist.” That’s precisely what Jamie Edwards calls himself. When most kids his age are off playing video games, Edwards stays late after school to work on a control panel for a nuclear fusion reactor. He just reached his goal of becoming the youngest “fusioneer”… Read More »

Users sue Linkedin over harvesting of email addresses

Four LinkedIn users have filed a lawsuit accusing the business-oriented social network of accessing their email accounts without permission, harvesting the addresses of their contacts and spamming those people with repeated invitations to join the service. In their most explosive claim, the plaintiffs say that LinkedIn is “breaking into” external email accounts, like Gmail or… Read More »

World’s oldest undeciphered writing

Proto-Elamite is the last remaining undeciphered writing from the ancient world The world’s oldest undeciphered writing system, which has so far defied attempts to uncover its 5,000-year-old secrets, could be about to be decoded by Oxford University academics. This international research project is already casting light on a lost bronze age middle eastern society where… Read More »

Compressing air for renewable energy storage

  Enough Northwest wind energy to power about 85,000 homes each month could be stored in porous rocks deep underground for later use, according to a new, comprehensive study. Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Bonneville Power Administration identified two unique methods for this energy storage approach and two eastern… Read More »

Another Chupacabra sighting in Texas?

This one is walking on four legs, but my eye-witness in California said it stood on the back two legs. The front legs do look shorter than the back here. I wonder if it can stand up like a kangaroo. Strange. (woai) “Michael Rigsby from Nacogdoches sent News 4 WOAI these pictures, but he isn’t… Read More »

Scientists Create First Lab-grown Limb

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have taken the first step toward developing artificial, lab-grown limbs, building a rat forelimb with functioning vascular and muscular tissue. This experimental approach could be applied to the limbs of primates – creating replacement limbs suitable for transplantation, a challenge because of the composite nature of limbs. “Limbs contain… Read More »

GMO labeling to be outlawed?

The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) is scheming to criminalize state-by-state GMO labeling laws in a deviously evil effort to keep consumers ignorant of what they’re eating. Remember, the GMA is the same organization that got caught running an illegal money laundering scheme in Washington state, secretly funneling money from big food manufacturers into a campaign… Read More »

Light-emitting nanotubes get brighter with zero-dimensional states

Carbon nanotubes have the potential to function as light-emitting devices, which could lead to a variety of nanophotonics applications. However, nanotubes currently have a low luminescence quantum yield, typically around 1%, which is restricted by their one-dimensional nature. In a new study, scientists have demonstrated that artificially modifying the dimensionality of carbon nanotubes by doping… Read More »