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The True Strange News Archives is a grab-bag of interesting stuff. Discover and explore unusual news, science breakthroughs, odd ideas and unlikely true events from around the world. Statement on world events: I, Xeno, oppose violence. My primary vibe is LOVE. Next curiosity, creativity, sexiness and deeper, sadness. I rarely feel anger, which I believe… Read More »

Japanese government seeks approval to dump Fukushima groundwater into sea

The government on Monday sought approval of a nationwide fisheries federation to dump groundwater at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex into the sea on condition that the water’s contamination level is far below the legal limit. During talks with the head of the National Federation of Fisheries Co-operative Associations, industry ministry officials explained that… Read More »

Radioactive Bluefin Tuna Caught Off California Coast

Radioactive Bluefin Tuna Caught Off California Coast 1 day ago from worldtruth.tv Every Bluefin tuna tested in the waters off California has shown to be contaminated with radiation that originated in Fukushima. Every single one. Over a year ago, in May of 2012, the Wall Street Journal reported on a Stanford University study. Daniel Madigan,… Read More »

Users sue Linkedin over harvesting of email addresses

Four LinkedIn users have filed a lawsuit accusing the business-oriented social network of accessing their email accounts without permission, harvesting the addresses of their contacts and spamming those people with repeated invitations to join the service. In their most explosive claim, the plaintiffs say that LinkedIn is “breaking into” external email accounts, like Gmail or… Read More »

Robot spacecraft ready for launch to study moon dust, NASA says

Weather conditions were “looking real good” for NASA’s Friday night launch of a small robotic spacecraft on a mission to investigate the mysterious moon dust that Apollo astronauts encountered decades ago, a spokesman said. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer spacecraft, known as LADEE, is scheduled for launch at 11:27 p.m. EDT on Friday… Read More »

How Leon Foucault taught us to watch the world spin

Leon Foucault and his pendulum demonstrated the turning of the Earth. Google honored the French physicist with an interactive doodle. It’s easy to forget that while you read this article, you and your computer screen are racing through space at a nearly unimaginable speed. The earth constantly rotates on its axis at 1,037 miles per… Read More »

Good news: type 2 diabetes is generally reversible

A new study from Newcastle University has shown that people who reverse their diabetes and then keep their weight down remain free of diabetes. … A growing body of evidence is showing that people with Type 2 diabetes who successfully lose weight can reverse their condition because fat is removed from their pancreas, returning insulin… Read More »

Solve a math puzzle, win $1 million

The Beal Prize was funded by Andrew Beal, a prominent banker who is also a mathematics enthusiast. An AMS-appointed committee will award this prize for either a proof of, or a counterexample to, the Beal Conjecture published in a refereed and respected mathematics publication. The prize money — currently US$1,000,000 — is being held in… Read More »

Pig Born With 2 Heads in China

A two-headed piglet was born in China earlier this week. According to the AFP, it was born on April 10th in a village in Jiujiang. A local vet told the AFP that the condition was cause by a rare deformity and thus the pig would likely not live very long. However, asthe Inquisitr reports, the… Read More »

Video: Solar Freakin’ Roadways

Not a good idea from an engineering point of view, but fun! For practical reasons we would be much better off building huge solar arrays across the Sahara desert, not to mention harnessing the tides. Tides are more predictable than wind energy and solar power. Among sources of renewable energy, tidal power has traditionally suffered… Read More »

Video: Enormous sink holes discovered in China

Natural sinkholes are rare, but researchers in China have just uncovered the largest cluster in the world, 49 of them covering an area of more than 231 square miles. Government officials in the Shaanxi province in northwest China report the collection of sinkholes was found during a recent survey of land around Hanzhong City. These… Read More »

Pregnant weightlifter provokes online storm

  Keeping fit during pregnancy is usually limited to a bracing walk or maybe a gentle swim. So when keen bodybuilder Lea-Ann Ellison — just two weeks away from giving birth — posted pictures of her pumping iron, it caused an outcry. The 35-year-old said: ‘After the birth of my second child, I knew I… Read More »

South Korea bans Japanese fish

… South Korea announced on Friday that it was banning all fish imports from along Japan’s northeastern coast because of what officials called growing public worry over radioactive water leaking into the Pacific Ocean near the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Fisheries in Fukushima prefecture are nearly all closed, and fish caught in nearby… Read More »

Carbon’s new champion: Theorists calculate atom-thick carbyne chains may be strongest material ever

Rice University researchers have determined from first-principle calculations that carbyne would be the strongest material yet discovered. The carbon-atom chains would be difficult to make but would be twice as strong as two-dimensional graphene sheets. (Image Credit: Vasilii Artyukhov/Rice University) Carbyne will be the strongest of a new class of microscopic materials if and when… Read More »

Mothman on Mercury?

This elevated rise on Mercury resembles a vaguely humanoid shape You’ve all heard of the “face on Mars” and the “man in the Moon” – well I guess this would be the “man on Mercury!” And I feel like I’ve seen him somewhere before… “Oh, they’ve encased him in carbonite. He should be quite well… Read More »

Scientists transform cement into liquid metal

It’s not the same as turning lead into gold, but scientists at the Illinois-based Argonne National Laboratory and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8 have developed a method for turning cement into a liquid metal semiconductor. The process sounds like a mad scientist’s invention. It involves equipment like an aerodynamic levitator and a carbon dioxide… Read More »

Scientists to Io: Your volcanoes are in the wrong place

Image: NASA’s New Horizons mission captured a giant plume from Io’s Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe’s Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in 2007 … Hamilton and his team performed the spatial analysis using the a new, global geologic map of Io, produced by David Williams of Arizona State… Read More »

A New Map of How We Think: Top Brain/Bottom Brain

… research reveals that the top-brain system uses information about the surrounding environment (in combination with other sorts of information, such as emotional reactions and the need for food or drink) to figure out which goals to try to achieve. It actively formulates plans, generates expectations about what should happen when a plan is executed… Read More »

In Seeing the Brain, Losing the Mind

Understanding the brain is of course essential to developing treatments for devastating illnesses like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s. More abstractly but no less compelling, the functioning of the brain is intimately tied to our sense of self, our identity, our memories and aspirations. But the excitement to explore the brain has spawned a new fixation that… Read More »

Brain Protein Is a Key to ‘Senior Moments,’ Study Finds

A protein in the brain could hold the key to reversing the age-related memory loss that causes “senior moments” of forgetfulness, Columbia University researchers report. Deficiency of a protein called RbAp48 in the hippocampus appears to significantly contribute to the memory loss that creeps up on you as you age, said study co-author Dr. Scott… Read More »

Bacteria can Shrink Tumors

If there is a microbial cause for cancers, and especially if certain microbes disable the human immune system in some way, then using other microbes to trigger the body’s immune system makes sense. In the 1890s, a New York surgeon named William Coley tested a radical cancer treatment. He took a hypodermic needle teeming with… Read More »

Dubai offers gold to fight obesity epidemic

Dubai’s government will pay residents in gold for losing those extra pounds as part of a government campaign to fight growing obesity in the Gulf Arab emirate. … The 30-day weight-loss challenge was launched on Friday to coincide with the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, when the faithful refrain from eating and drinking during daylight… Read More »

Reader Comments: Chupacabra

Yo, I am a veterinarian in northern minnesota and I have two of these type of creatures in my practice. They are dogs suffering from genetic skin mutations. Many dogs which have “blue” coats, like some Samoyeds, some Dobermans, and others can throw dangerous genetic skin mutations which will make the animal hairless. In addition… Read More »

Video: Giant squid filmed in its natural environment : Nature News & Comment

Ocean explorers have finally achieved one of their most alluring but elusive goals: video footage of the legendary giant squid (Architeuthis dux)in its natural deep-sea habitat. Scientists say that the spectacular film, captured during an expedition off Japan’s Ogasawara archipelago, answers enduring questions about the enigmatic invertebrate. The 6-week mission was funded by the Japan… Read More »

‘Seeing’ the flavor of foods

 The eyes sometimes have it, beating out the tongue, nose and brain in the emotional and biochemical balloting that determines the taste and allure of food, a scientist said here today. Speaking at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), he described how people sometimes “see” flavors in foods and… Read More »

U.S. begins flying deportees to Mexico City

U.S. immigration authorities have begun flying deportees deep into Mexico in an effort to discourage them from trying to return. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says the first of twice-weekly flights from El Paso, Texas, to Mexico City left Thursday with 133 deportees aboard, all men. ICE spokeswoman Nicole Navas says the flights will accommodate… Read More »

Video: Chladni Figures: Amazing Resonance Experiment

Warning: Turn your volume way down during this entire video. The sound that produces the patterns is loud enough to cause permanent hearing damage. … This demonstration is by a prolific YouTube user who goes by the handle brusspup. I’ve been enjoying his amazing visual illusions for a few years – and I’m not the… Read More »

Robot finds mysterious spheres in ancient temple

The archaeologists used a 3-foot-long, remote-controlled robot which was able to explore the last part of the tunnel. Hundreds of mysterious spheres lie beneath the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, an ancient six-level step pyramid just 30 miles from Mexico City. The enigmatic spheres were found during an archaeological dig using a camera-equipped robot at… Read More »

Raw Milk Confirmed as Low Risk

Three quantitative microbial risk assessments (QMRAs) recently published in the Journal of Food Protection have demonstrated that unpasteurized milk is a low-risk food, contrary to previous, inappropriately-evidenced claims suggesting a high-risk profile.€  These scholarly papers, along with dozens of others, were reviewed on May 16, 2013 at the Centre for Disease Control in Vancouver, BC… Read More »

Vehicles: Baywatch cop busted in bid to save electric cars.

(woai) ‘Baywatch’ cop busted in bid to save electric cars. GM is shipping EV1s to be crushed. “Baywatch” actress Alexandra Paul and another woman were arrested Monday after blocking the path of trucks hauling GM’s pioneering EV1 electric cars to Arizona to be destroyed, police said. “The company said the cars never became popular enough… Read More »

Video: Robotic Cheetah that can jump over small walls

This robotic cheetah from MIT is fun to watch (video below) To get a running jump, the robot plans out its path, much like a human runner: As it detects an approaching obstacle, it estimates that object’s height and distance. The robot gauges the best position from which to jump, and adjusts its stride to… Read More »

The Anchoring Effect

Your teen is in desperate need of a new wardrobe. You set a day for a shopping trip. Lucky you. It’s not long until your daughter finds the perfect pair of jeans. Great, you tell her — until you check the price tag: $149.95. “Sorry honey, no deal. Too expensive. I’m sure you can find… Read More »

UCI researchers fabricate new camouflage coating from squid protein

What can the U.S. military learn from a common squid? A lot about how to hide from enemies, according to researchers at UC Irvine’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering. As detailed in a study published online in Advanced Materials, they have created a biomimetic infrared camouflage coating inspired by Loliginidae, also known as pencil squids… Read More »

Bigfoot-Shaped Rock Is A Rock, Not A Bigfoot Fossil Skull

Man Believes He Found Fossilized Bigfoot Head Standard-Examiner This story has given us the most amusing quote we’ve heard all week and yes, we realize it’s only Monday. From Kenneth Carpenter, director of paleontology at Utah State University: “I’ll admit that it is the most head-like rock I have seen.” This statement was in response… Read More »

Hairpin turn: Micro-RNA plays role in wood formation

For more than a decade, scientists have suspected that hairpin-shaped chains of micro-RNA regulate wood formation inside plant cells. Now, scientists at NC State University have found the first example and mapped out key relationships that control the process. The research, published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of June… Read More »

Scientific Study Proves TV Making Kids Dumber

The study found that every hourly increase in daily television viewing at 29 months of age is associated with diminished vocabulary and math skills, classroom engagement (which is largely determined by attention skills), victimization by classmates, and physical prowess at kindergarten, according to Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and the CHU Sainte-Justine children’s… Read More »

Mindfulness Meditation Helps Pain, Anxiety and Depression

People are increasingly turning to mindfulness mediation to manage health issues, and meditation classes are being offered through schools and hospitals. But doctors have questioned whether this ancient Eastern practice really offers measurable health benefits. A fresh review of the evidence should help sort that out. Meditation does help manage anxiety, depression and pain, according… Read More »