Why “thick” blood protects from a heart attack

By | August 25, 2009

“Thick” blood can cause heart attack and stroke, but also prevent them. Scientists at Heidelberg University Hospital have explained the mechanism of this clinical paradox for the first time on an animal model. Mice with a greater tendency to form blood clots have larger plaques in their vessels, but they are more stable. Thus, there is less risk that these plaques will rupture and obstruct circulation. The results of the study have been published in the prestigious journal Circulation.

In principle, the more blood coagulates, the greater is the risk of vascular obstruction. Anticoagulants protect against these complications. But clinical studies have thus far not proven that an increased clotting tendency also has a detrimental effect for plaque development. …

Caution advised when prescribing anticoagulants

“Our findings were made on mice, but they confirm the results of clinical studies on humans,” says Dr. Isermann. “In addition, in vitro studies show that human cells react similarly to mouse cells.” The team assumes that the results can be transferred to humans and recommends weighing the advantages and disadvantages of anticoagulants carefully before administering them to a patient.

via UniversitätsKlinikum Heidelberg: Why “thick” blood protects from a heart attack.

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