The Georgia Guidestones, What do you think of the message?

By | March 26, 2010

The Georgia Guidestones What do you think of the message

The Georgia Guidestones is a large granite monument in Elbert County, Georgia, USA. A message comprising ten guides is inscribed on the structure in eight modern languages, and a shorter message is inscribed at the top of the structure in four ancient languages’ scripts: Babylonian, Classical Greek, Sanskrit, and Egyptian hieroglyphs.

The structure is sometimes referred to as an “American Stonehenge.”[1] The monument is almost 20 feet (6.1 m) tall if the buried support stones are included, exactly 5.5 metres (18 ft) otherwise[2], and made from six granite slabs weighing more than 240,000 pounds (110,000 kg) in all.[3] One slab stands in the center, with four arranged around it. A capstone lies on top of the five slabs, which are astronomically aligned. An additional stone tablet, which is set in the ground a short distance to the west of the structure, provides some notes on the history and purpose of the Guidestones.

A message consisting of a set of ten guidelines or principles is engraved on the Georgia Guidestones in eight different languages, one language on each face of the four large upright stones. Moving clockwise around the structure from due north, these languages are: English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.

Yoko Ono and others have praised the inscribed messages as “a stirring call to rational thinking”, while opponents have labeled them as the “Ten Commandments of the Antichrist”.

The Guidestones have become a subject of interest for conspiracy theorists. One of them, an activist named Mark Dice, demanded that the Guidestones “be smashed into a million pieces, and then the rubble used for a construction project”, claiming that the Guidestones are of “a deep Satanic origin,” and that R. C. Christian, belongs to “a Luciferian secret society” related to the New World Order. At the unveiling of the monument, a local minister proclaimed that he believed the monument was “for sun worshipers, for cult worship and for devil worship”.

Another popular conspiracy theorist, Alex Jones, in his 2008 documentary ‘Endgame: Elite’s Blueprint For Global Enslavement’ highlights “the message of the mysterious Georgia Guidestones, purportedly built by representatives of a secret society called the Rosicrucian Order, which call for a global religion, world courts, and for population levels to be maintained at around 500 million, over a 5.5 billion reduction from current levels. The stones infer that humans are a cancer upon the earth and should be culled in order to maintain balance with nature.

Here are the 10 guidelines. What do you think? I think 2-3 billion is more realistic…

  1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
  2. Guide reproduction wisely – improving fitness and diversity.
  3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
  4. Rule passion – faith – tradition – and all things with tempered reason.
  5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
  6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
  7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
  8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
  9. Prize truth – beauty – love – seeking harmony with the infinite.
  10. Be not a cancer on the earth – Leave room for nature – Leave room for nature.

via Georgia Guidestones – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

2 thoughts on “The Georgia Guidestones, What do you think of the message?

  1. Ann

    And, a word from the critics:

    “be smashed into a million pieces, and then the rubble used for a construction project”

    “a Luciferian secret society”

    “for sun worshipers, for cult worship and for devil worship”

    Nothing like Americans keeping the world laughing. The only sad problem are presumably serious. I wonder if these responses have anything to do with the quality of education in the States.

  2. Sepp

    Those ten points are someone’s idea of how things should be.

    The only thing that distinguishes them from your or my idea is that the person had so much money that they could set their opinion into stone. I don’t think that is a point in favor of what is said.

    In other words – those “guidelines” are as good as anyone’s guess.

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