Super High Pressrure Bacteria, Methane and the Bermuda Triangle.

By | August 2, 2005

“Scientists and engineers at Cardiff University are investigating bacteria from deep sediments which despite high pressures (greater than 1,000 atmospheres), gradually increasing btritemperatures (from an icy 2?C to over 100?C), great depth (several kilometres) and age (many millions of years) may contain most of the bacteria on Earth. Some of these bacteria produce methane that btri2accumulates in “gas hydrates” — a super concentrated methane ice that contains more carbon than all conventional fossil fuels and, therefore, a potentially enormous energy source. … One theory now suggests that when the covering of “methane ice” which exists over much of the seabed of the Bermuda Triangle becomes unstable; this causes instability of the sea and an explosive mixture of air and methane above. Any ships or planes travelling over the area could sink or catch fire.

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“So ancient, deep-sediment bacteria may be a key to sustainable energy in the future and to explaining a few disasters,” said Professor Parkes. ” – more

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