Scientists Discover ‘Dancing’ Algae

By | April 22, 2009

Scientists Discover 'Dancing' Algae

Scientists at the Cambridge University have discovered that freshwater algae can form stable groupings in which they dance around each other, miraculously held together only by the fluid flows they create.

The researchers studied the multicellular organism Volvox, which consists of approximately 1,000 cells arranged on the surface of a spherical matrix about half a millimetre in diameter. Each of the surface cells has two hair-like appendages known as flagella, whose beating propels the colony through the fluid and simultaneously makes them spin about an axis.

The researchers found that colonies swimming near a surface can form two types of “bound states”; the “waltz”, in which the two colonies orbit around each other like a planet circling the sun, and the “minuet”, in which the colonies oscillate back and forth as if held by an elastic band between them. …

Professor Raymond E. Goldstein, the Schlumberger Professor of Complex Physical Systems in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP) and lead author of the study, said: “These striking and unexpected results remind us not only of the grace and beauty of life, but also that remarkable phenomena can emerge from very simple ingredients.”

via Scientists Discover ‘Dancing’ Algae.

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