‘Rare’ mammoth skull discovered

By | September 4, 2008

The “extremely rare” fossilised skull of a steppe mammoth has been unearthed in southern France.

The discovery in the Auvergne region could shed much needed light on the evolution of these mighty beasts.

Many isolated teeth of steppe mammoth have been found, but only a handful of skeletons exist; and in these surviving specimens, the skull is rarely intact.

Palaeontologists Frederic Lacombat and Dick Mol describe this skull specimen as being well preserved.

It belongs to a male steppe mammoth (Mammuthus trogontherii) that stood about 3.7m (12ft) tall and lived about 400,000 years ago, during Middle Pleistocene times.  The animal was about 35 years of age when it died, the researchers estimate. – bbc

Where is the mammoth skull, behind that big rock? Oh, it IS that big rock.

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