Oldest Skeleton in Americas Found in Underwater Cave?

By | October 9, 2008

Deep inside an underwater cave in Mexico, archaeologists may have discovered the oldest human skeleton ever found in the Americas. Dubbed Eva de Naharon, or Eve of Naharon, the female skeleton has been dated at 13,600 years old. If that age is accurate, the skeleton—along with three others found in underwater caves along the Caribbean coast of the Yucatán Peninsula—could provide new clues to how the Americas were first populated.

The remains have been excavated over the past four years near the town of Tulum, about 80 miles southwest of Cancún, by a team of scientists led by Arturo González, director of the Desert Museum in Saltillo, Mexico (see map of Mexico).

“We don’t now how [the people whose remains were found in the caves] arrived and whether they came from the Atlantic, the jungle, or inside the continent,” González said.

“But we believe these finds are the oldest yet to be found in the Americas and may influence our theories of how the first people arrived.”

In addition to possibly altering the time line of human settlement in the Americas, the remains may cause experts to rethink where the first Americans came from, González added. – natgeo

I once met an experienced cave diver who showed me some amazing photos. He had discovered the skeleton of a giant in a cave in Calaveras County.  He also showed me the official letter from the state of California asking him not to tell anyone about the discovery. Some archaeological finds are covered up when they fall simply too far outside of what is believed about our past.

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