Light’s Most Exotic Trick Yet: So Fast it Goes … Backwards?

By | May 15, 2006

Lights Most Exotic Trick Yet So Fast it Goes  Backwards

In the past few years, scientists have found ways to make light go both faster and slower than its usual speed limit, but now researchers at the University of Rochester have published a paper today in Science on how they’ve gone one step further: pushing light into reverse. As if to defy common sense, the backward-moving pulse of light travels faster than light. Confused? You’re not alone.

“I’ve had some of the world’s experts scratching their heads over this one,” says Robert Boyd, the M. Parker Givens Professor of Optics at the University of Rochester. “Theory predicted that we could send light backwards, but nobody knew if the theory would hold up or even if it could be observed in laboratory conditions.”

Boyd recently showed how he can slow down a pulse of light to slower than an airplane, or speed it up faster than its breakneck pace, using exotic techniques and materials. But he’s now taken what was once just a mathematical oddity?negative speed?and shown it working in the real world.

“It’s weird stuff,” says Boyd. “We sent a pulse through an optical fiber, and before its peak even entered the fiber, it was exiting the other end. Through experiments we were able to see that the pulse inside the fiber was actually moving backward, linking the input and output pulses. – physorg

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