Introns — nonsense DNA — may be more important to evolution of genomes than thought

By | December 15, 2009

The sequences of nonsense DNA that interrupt genes could be far more important to the evolution of genomes than previously thought, according to a recent Science report by Indiana University Bloomington and University of New Hampshire biologists.Their study of the model organism Daphnia pulex (water flea) is the first to demonstrate the colonization of a single lineage by “introns,” as the interrupting sequences are known. The scientists say introns are inserted into the genome far more frequently than current models predict. The scientists also found what appear to be “hot spots” for intron insertion — areas of the genome where repeated insertions are more likely to occur. And surprisingly, the vast majority of intron DNA sequences the scientists examined were of unknown origin.

via Introns — nonsense DNA — may be more important to evolution of genomes than thought.

Leave a Reply