‘Deepest ever’ living fish filmed

By | October 8, 2008

The “deepest ever” living fish have been discovered, scientists believe.

A UK-Japan team found the 17-strong shoal at depths of 7.7km (4.8 miles) in the Japan Trench in the Pacific – and captured the deep sea animals on film.

The scientists have been using remote-operated landers designed to withstand immense pressures to comb the world’s deepest depths for marine life.

Monty Priede from the University of Aberdeen said the 30cm-long (12in), deep-sea fish were surprisingly “cute”. The fish, known as Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis, can be seen darting about in the darkness of the depths, scooping up shrimps. Alan Jamieson, from the University of Aberdeen, said: “It was an honour to see these fish.
“No-one has ever seen fish alive at these depths before – you just never know what you are going to see when you get down there.”

The deepest record for any fish is Abyssobrotula galatheae, which was dredged from the bottom of the Puerto Rico Trench at a depth of more than 8km (5 miles) in 1970. However, it was dead by the time it reached the surface. – bbc

Check out the video of these cool fish here.

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