Category Archives: Biology

Spongy Handshake with Doctor Saves Man’s Life

It was nothing more than a warm handshake between two people meeting for the first time – but it was a gesture that saved Mark Gurrieri’s life. The hand that clasped his belonged to a GP, Dr Chris Britt, who noticed a ‘fleshy and spongy’ feeling which instantly triggered his professional concern. A glance at… Read More »

Bacteria can Shrink Tumors

If there is a microbial cause for cancers, and especially if certain microbes disable the human immune system in some way, then using other microbes to trigger the body’s immune system makes sense. In the 1890s, a New York surgeon named William Coley tested a radical cancer treatment. He took a hypodermic needle teeming with… Read More »

Video: Bighorn sheep breaks window. Know why?

Watch this video of a bighorn sheep breaking a glass window. It looks like a case of mischievous vandalism. What’s going on? Christian Addie said he was on his lunch break Tuesday afternoon when he decided to film a small group of bighorn sheep wandering the streets of Glenwood Springs. Addie, who posted his video… Read More »

Scientists discover bees of the sea

For the first time, researchers have found evidence that underwater ecosystems have pollinators that perform the same task as bees on land. Just like their terrestrial cousins, grasses under the sea shed pollen to sexually reproduce. Until now, biologists assumed the marine plants relied on water alone to spread their genes far and wide. But… Read More »

Fighting superbug bacteria with other bacteria

Want to save 10 million people? Find a solution to superbugs. … If things keep going as they are, antibiotic-resistant superbugs are expected to kill 10 million people by 2050, and so far, we have no solution. But researchers have found that we could actually fight fire with fire – a predatory bacterium has been… Read More »

S.African man with penis transplant to become father

A South African man who received the world’s first successful penis transplant is to become a father just months after undergoing surgery, his doctor said Friday. Urologist Andre van der Merwe, who led the team that performed the operation, told AFP that the 21-year-old’s girlfriend was pregnant. “I was informed by him that his partner… Read More »

Meditation Improves Brain Function

There is mounting evidence from researchers at leading research institutions about the benefits of meditation for brain health and function. One of the latest series of studies, from researchers at Harvard, was explained at length in the Washington Post. The short story – meditation improves brain function and grows the brain in important ways. Sara… Read More »

Scientists Create First Lab-grown Limb

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have taken the first step toward developing artificial, lab-grown limbs, building a rat forelimb with functioning vascular and muscular tissue. This experimental approach could be applied to the limbs of primates – creating replacement limbs suitable for transplantation, a challenge because of the composite nature of limbs. “Limbs contain… Read More »

Woman sees dragon faces

A 52-year-old woman whose rare condition was reported in The Lancet suffered from hallucinations that caused her to see human faces as dragons. “She could perceive and recognize actual faces, but after several minutes they turned black, grew long, pointy ears and a protruding snout, and displayed a reptiloid skin and huge eyes in bright… Read More »

I’m 2.8% god. What % are you?

Yahoo answers are like the junk food of answers on the net. So many “best answers” on here are 100% wrong. For example, one “best answer” with the source being “Geneticist” said that we are genetically unrelated to Neanderthal man. Wrong. All of us alive today, with the exception of a small group in Africa,… Read More »

Teleportation of consciousness rediscovered

Chew on this for a few years… Recent experiments by researchers at the Karolinksa Institutet in Sweden show that it is possible to rather easily trick the mind’s sense of self into leaving the body. Given visual cues and physical sensations of the right timing your brain will ‘teleport’ what you experience as ‘you’ into space, into a complete… Read More »

The Chemistry of Love

How are you doing in the LOVE department? Are you IN love? Breaking up? Sad and lonely? Angry at the world? Have you never been in love?  Not sure? Here’s a bit of love science in case you might need it. Love is a mechanism nature uses to ensure that we reproduce and that our… Read More »

Daylight Savings Time Is Rough on Your Health

I had the few days around Daylight Savings Time are one of the prime times for hospitals to be busy, in my experience. Do you have a healthy way to deal with the stress of changing your sleep hours? The research is quite clear on the health effects of this meddling with time. In short,… Read More »

Gut microbes predict undernutrition

Gut microbes may predict whether or not children will suffer undernutrition as they grow, according to a study with twins in Malawi. Tens of trillions of microbes live in the gut, where they synthesize vitamins and process nutrients in the diet to keep the body healthy. These microbes and their genes, collectively known as the… Read More »

The only known dwarf who grew to be a giant

Adam Rainer (1899 – 4 March 1950) is the only person in recorded history to have been both a dwarf and a giant. Rainer was born in Graz, Austria-Hungary. In 1917, at age 18, he was measured at 122.55 cm (4 ft 0.25 in). A typical defining characteristic of dwarfism is an adult height below… Read More »

Hoxsey: The “Quack” who Cured Cancer

What was the formula?  Wikipedia says this: Hoxsey herbal treatments include a topical paste of antimony, zinc and bloodroot, arsenic, sulfur, and talc for external treatments, and a liquid tonic of licorice, red clover, burdock root, Stillingia root, barberry, Cascara, prickly ash bark, buckthorn bark, and potassium iodide for internal consumption.[17] In addition to the… Read More »

Monkeys killed by Airborne Ebola

Ebola can spread by air in cold, dry weather common to the U.S. but not West Africa, presenting a “possible, serious threat” to the public, according to two studies by U.S. Army scientists. After successfully exposing monkeys to airborne Ebola, which “caused a rapidly fatal disease in 4-5 days,” scientists with the U.S. Army Medical… Read More »

New hope for diabetics from babies who make too much insulin

16-Jan-2014 Targeting a cell cycle inhibitor promotes beta cell replication One of the factors underlying the development of type 2 diabetes is loss of β cell mass, resulting in decreased insulin production. Once lost, β cell mass cannot be restored. In contrast, infants with focal hyperinsulinism of infancy exhibit rapid expansion of the β cell… Read More »

Vermont passes GMO labeling law

Senator David Zuckerman and Representative Carolyn Partridge describe the amazing efforts, which spanned more than a decade, resulting in this unprecedented, game-changing new law…. Here’s the quick facts: 1. Starting July 1, 2016, products sold in Vermont that contain more than 0.9% GMO content contamination will require a statement on the label indicating that genetic… Read More »

The Eagle Cam

Both cameras are equipped with infrared (IR) technology that allows viewing at night. This light spectrum is outside the viewing range of both bald eagles and humans. When on location at night, no light source can be seen by the naked eye. In September 2013, our bald eagle couple returned to the Berry College campus… Read More »

The pink fairy armadillo of Argentina.

… in the deserts of Argentina. Here dwells the remarkable pink fairy armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus), a 5-inch-long, quarter-pound critter with a rosy shell atop silky white hair. This smallest of all armadillos spends almost its entire life burrowing through the earth, hunting various invertebrates and chewing up plant matter. It is a rarely seen, almost… Read More »

Spiders build sculptures of other spiders

Two species of spider have been discovered building life-like spider effigies from dead insects, leaves, & twigs. What’s remarkable is that one species is in Peru, the other in the Philippines. Scientists think the spider sculptures either help lure prey or scare off predators. Perhaps the spiders are just very lonely. Or even more disturbing,… Read More »

Caveman With Blue Eyes Shocks Scientists

Scientists examining the DNA of ancient remains find surprising new evidence of how early Europeans had dark skin and blue eyes. Image: An artist’s impression of the face of a 7,000-year-old man, reconstructed from his skeleton. His remains were discovered in a cold subterranean cave 5,000ft below sea level in the Cantabrian mountains of northwest… Read More »

Vaccine ‘pioneer’ admits adding cancer-causing virus to Vaccine

In this interview Dr. Maurice Hilleman reveals some astounding revelations. He admits that Merck drug company vaccines (Polio) had been deliberately contaminated with SV40, a cancer-causing monkey virus from 1953 – 63. For years, researchers suggested that millions of vials of polio vaccine, contaminated with SV40, infected individuals which caused human tumors, and by 1999,… Read More »

Are there any known virgin births? Sort of, but not really

Parthenogenesis is a form of asexual reproduction in which growth and development of embryos occur without fertilization. In animals, parthenogenesis means development of an embryo from an unfertilized egg cell. Are there any case reports of virgin births in the medical literature? Sort of. According to a 1995 report in the journal Nature Genetics, a… Read More »

Parasitic DNA proliferates in aging tissues

The genomes of organisms from humans to corn are replete with “parasitic” strands of DNA that, when not suppressed, copy themselves and spread throughout the genome, potentially affecting health. Earlier this year Brown University researchers found that these “retrotransposable elements” were increasingly able to break free of the genome’s control in cultures of human cells.… Read More »

Cells from the eye are inkjet printed for the first time

A group of researchers from the UK have used inkjet printing technology to successfully print cells taken from the eye for the very first time. The breakthrough, which has been detailed in a paper published today, 18 December, in IOP Publishing’s journal Biofabrication, could lead to the production of artificial tissue grafts made from the… Read More »

Kidney grown from stem cells by Australian scientists

A kidney grown in a dish as seen under the microscope – link Scientists in Australia have grown the world’s first kidney from stem cells – a tiny organ which could eventually help to reduce the wait for transplants. The breakthrough, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, followed years of research and involved the… Read More »

Surprising diversity in aging revealed in nature

For several species mortality increases with age — as expected by evolutionary scientists. This pattern is seen in most mammal species including humans and killer whales, but also in invertebrates like water fleas. However, other species experience a decrease in mortality as they age, and in some cases mortality drops all the way up to… Read More »

Your brain is eating itself constantly

A type of brain cell once thought to be little more than the neuron’s supportive sidekick may have a lead role in pruning the electrochemical connections that are crucial to brain development, learning, memory and cognition, a new study suggests. Astrocytes, a type of glial cell, turn out to be veritable Pac-men, steadily gobbling up… Read More »

Sexual frustration decreases lifespan — at least in flies

This will change your whole concept of dead sexy: The chemical attractant wafting from a female fruit fly shortened the lifespan of male flies when the femme fatale didn’t deliver on the signal’s promise, according to a new study. Male fruit flies who pick up on the female pheromone will decrease their fat stores and… Read More »

Seahorses stalk their prey by stealth

The beautiful creatures are famously bad swimmers, but they have a secret weapon to sneak up on their prey. Their peculiar snouts are shaped to create very few ripples in the water, effectively cloaking them as they creep up and pounce on tiny crustaceans. To their victims, seahorses are more like sea monsters, say scientists… Read More »

Mushrooms ‘Make Wind’ to Spread Spores

Many once thought that mushrooms spread by passively dropping their spores, after which the reproductive packets would hopefully get picked up by a gust of wind, and carried thither and yon. But new research shows mushrooms take a more active role in spreading their seed: They “make wind” to carry their spores about, said UCLA… Read More »

Ethical debate on face transplantation has evolved over time

Once viewed as an “outlandish morally objectionable” concept with science-fiction overtones, face transplantation is now accepted as a “feasible and necessary treatment” for severely disfigured patients. The evolving ethical debate over face transplantation is analyzed in a special topic paper in the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the… Read More »

Colossal new predatory dino terrorized early tyrannosaurs

This is an illustration of Siats meekerorum. Credit: Jorge GonzalesA new species of carnivorous dinosaur – one of the three largest ever discovered in North America – lived alongside and competed with small-bodied tyrannosaurs 98 million years ago. This newly discovered species, Siats meekerorum, (pronounced see-atch) was the apex predator of its time, and kept… Read More »

Scientists killed world’s oldest living creature

When scientists inadvertently killed what turned out to be the world’s oldest living creature, it was bad enough. Now, their mistake has been compounded after further research found it was even older – at 507 years. The ocean quahog – a type of deep-sea clam – was dredged alive from the bottom of the North… Read More »