Acorn Watchers Wonder What Happened to Crop

By | December 1, 2008

acorn… The absence of acorns could have something to do with the weather, Simmons thought. But he hoped it wasn’t a climatic event. “Let’s hope it’s not something ghastly going on with the natural world.”

To find out, Simmons and Arlington naturalists began calling around. A naturalist in Maryland found no acorns on an Audubon nature walk there. Ditto for Fairfax, Falls Church, Charles County, even as far away as Pennsylvania. There are no acorns falling from the majestic oaks in Arlington National Cemetery.

“Once I started paying attention, I couldn’t find any acorns anywhere. Not from white oaks, red oaks or black oaks, and this was supposed to be their big year,” said Greg Zell, a naturalist at Long Branch Nature Center in Arlington. “We’re talking zero. Not a single acorn. It’s really bizarre.”

Zell began to do some research. He found Internet discussion groups, including one on Topix called “No acorns this year,” reporting the same thing from as far away as the Midwest up through New England and Nova Scotia. “We live in Glenwood Landing, N.Y., and don’t have any acorns this year. Really weird,” wrote one. “None in Kansas either! Curiouser and curiouser.” …

Garris started calling nurseries. “I was worried they’d think I was crazy. But they said I wasn’t the only one calling who was concerned about it,” she said. “This is the first time I can remember in my lifetime not seeing any acorns drop in the fall and I’m 53. You have to wonder, is it global warming? Is it environmental? It makes you wonder what’s going on.”

Simmons has a theory about the wet and dry cycles. But many skeptics say oaks in other regions are producing plenty of acorns, and the acorn bust here is nothing more than the extreme of a natural boom-and-bust cycle. But the bottom line is that no one really knows. “It’s sort of a mystery,” Zell said. …

Oaks are one of the few trees that can self-pollinate and “clone” themselves. But they prefer the genetic variety that comes from the flowers of male trees pollinating the flowers of female trees. That’s a dance that takes place every spring, usually in May, for anywhere from seven days to two weeks, depending on the weather.

And the weather is critical. A late frost can kill the flowers and any chance of pollination….
Whatever the reason for no acorns, foresters and botanists are paying attention.

But they say they’re not worried yet. “What’s there to worry about?” said Alan Whittemire, a botanist at the U.S. Arboretum. “If you’re a squirrel, it’s a big worry. But it’s no problem for the oak tree. They live a long time. They’ll produce acorns again when they’re ready to.”

White oaks can live as long as 300 years. Faster-growing red oaks can reach 200. And it takes only one acorn to make a tree … – washpost

Could it be the lack of bees? Probably not:

Bee’s may feed on the pollen from oak flowers and help pollination, but oaks rely mainly on wind for pollination. – wstb

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